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Why does a ball stop bouncing

By | 07.10.2020

By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service. Physics Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for active researchers, academics and students of physics. It only takes a minute to sign up. In short: Do bouncing balls keep bouncing forever? If not, does it have to do more with energy than velocity? If energy is conserved, why do bouncing balls, pendulums, and other cyclic systems eventually stop moving?

The result is that most objects moving in cycles eventually move less and less and then finally stop. But that wouldn't make sense mathematically: although the limit converges to zero, it doesn't fully ever approach it.

Do the mathematical laws break down at the micro physical level much like they do in general relativity?

why does a ball stop bouncing

Every simple equation we use to model a system is based on assumptions, and these assumptions often cease to be accurate after a certain amount of time. Given the intuition you may have developed from the simple versions of pendulums, bouncing balls, etc. Really, we have to consider what actually happens in these systems and how long our assumptions are valid. The pendulum is easier. A perfect pendulum will swing forever. What is it that makes a pendulum non-perfect?

Friction can come from the air around it and the pivot it swings on. Also, the swinging of the pendulum pulls its pivot side-to-side, transferring a little bit of energy into the system it's hanging from. Each of these effects can be characterized, but doing that requires some assumptions.

Let's just worry about the friction. Kinetic friction is the frictional force between two moving surfaces. If the surfaces aren't moving any longer, the surfaces 'settle in' a bit more and don't give way so easily. If you move slowly enough, however, you can get a little bit of both. This is what makes cellos to sound, hinges to squeak, and tires to screech. Static friction will kill your pendulum. As for the bouncing ball, what is it that makes it bounce?

When the ball hits the ground, it deforms and snaps back into place, launching itself into the air. But the ball doesn't return all of the energy; some of it ripples around the ball while it's in the air. Watch this video for a great example of that.

Eventually, the impact will be enough to deform the ball a little, but the 'snapping back' won't be enough to launch it into the air. Even more likely, the ball will hit at such a time that its vibrations and its motion cancel out, like when you jump on a trampoline right after someone next to you and steal their jump.

Physics is all about making complex things simple enough to understand, but in the end we only want to understand them well enough that we can make them complex again. Just an addition to the other good answer: while dissipation reduces the amplitude it is not the cause for the breakdown of the underlying model.

Even with dissipation you could have in theory an ever shrinking oscillation amplitude. But we can answer the second part of the question "Do the mathematical laws break down at the micro physical level much like they do in general relativity?

Yes, the mathematical model is based on Newtonian physics. At smaller and smaller amplitudes quantum effects dominate and a completely different approach is required. The oscillation amplitude can be described by the Heisenberg principle and will never be exactly zero. The height of bounce will asymptote to zero, so also the time taken for the bounce will get smaller and smaller and also asymptote to zero.If we can't tunnel through the Earth, how do we know what's at its center?

All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply. Hottest Questions. Previously Viewed. Unanswered Questions. Wiki User Because of gravitatational forces and earth circumfrences. Related Questions Asked in Energy Why a bouncing ball come to a stop? Every time it bounces, it loses energy, so eventually stops. Asked in Physics, Energy, Kinematics When an object falls from a height and bounces it's energy changes form When a ball bounces it's potential and kinetic energies change Eventually the ball will stop bouncing Why does the ball stop?

That creates energy. The only way the ball can release the energy is bouncing back up. But the ball starts to lose its height and the ball eventually loses its energy and comes to a stop. Asked in Physics When was Bouncing ball created? Bouncing ball was created in Asked in Science, Sports, Science Experiments How do you stop a tennis ball from bouncing using the cold? Asked in Basketball What is double dribble in basketball terms?

It can also mean to bounce the ball with 2 hands but that hardly ever happens. Asked in Physics Is a bouncing ball an example of simple harmonic motion? Asked in Physics What is the longest time for bouncing a ball? The longest time for bouncing a ball is 17 hours 24mins.

Asked in Physics Why is energy lost during bouncing? A lot of things happen when an object bounces. Some of the objects energy, or momentum, goes into the floor which causes the surrounding floor to warm up slightly. Also, there is inefficiency that will cause the ball to eventually stop bouncing. Also, hearing the ball hit the floor means that energy went into the surrounding air molecules, causing them to heat up slightly as well as allowing you to hear the ball hit the floor.

All of this causes energy to be lost in the bouncing. Asked in Physics Why doesn't a ball bounce forever? Balls don't bounce forever because some of the energy making the ball bounce is changed into thermal heat energy when it hits a surface.

It will eventually stop bouncing when all of the kinetic and potential energy is changed to thermal energy. Asked in Physics, Chemistry Why does bouncing ball bounces back whereas a cricket ball don't? It's because the surface area of a bouncing ball is more and it is thickly elastic.If we can't tunnel through the Earth, how do we know what's at its center? All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.

Hottest Questions. Previously Viewed. Unanswered Questions. Wiki User Every time it bounces, it loses energy, so eventually stops. Related Questions Asked in Physics Why does a bouncing ball eventually stop?

Because of gravitatational forces and earth circumfrences.

Bounce ball vs Hydraulic Press - Dont stop bouncing

Asked in Physics When was Bouncing ball created? Bouncing ball was created in Asked in Science, Sports, Science Experiments How do you stop a tennis ball from bouncing using the cold? Asked in Science, Physics Song lyrics Bouncing ball bounce right back to me?

The lyric is " rubber ball, you come bouncing back to me" The song is "Rubber Ball" sung by Bobby Vee. Written by Aaron Schroeder and Ann Orlowski. Asked in Basketball What is double dribble in basketball terms? It can also mean to bounce the ball with 2 hands but that hardly ever happens. Asked in Physics Is a bouncing ball an example of simple harmonic motion?

Asked in Physics What is the longest time for bouncing a ball? The longest time for bouncing a ball is 17 hours 24mins. Asked in Menstruation Will bouncing on an excersise ball make your period come faster? No, bouncing on an exercise ball will not make your period come faster.

Your period is controlledby your menstrual cycle, nothing you do can speed-up when your period will start as you can't speed-up your cycle or skip phases. Asked in Physics Why does bouncing happen? Asked in Physics, Chemistry Why does bouncing ball bounces back whereas a cricket ball don't?

It's because the surface area of a bouncing ball is more and it is thickly elastic. Asked in Basketball Rules and Regulations What is illegal dribbling in basketball? Bouncing the ball very high into the air with all your might.I was thinking about this question for a while and i still dont get it, Okay so here is like an example, I threw a bouncy ball very hard on the ground and it bounced back up over me even, then it went down and up and down and up and slowly it stopped, My question is why does it stop?

When i threw it it went higher then me so shouldnt it have enough force after it bounced up the first time to continue going up at the same height and not bouncing? Or is it the force of gravity that eventually stops it? The reason it went higher than you on the first bounce was that you gave it some extra energy by throwing it forcibly down. You would find and you should try this that if you simply let it drop out of your fingers, instead of throwing it downward, that in that case it will NOT bounce up higher than you--in fact, it won't even bounce up as high as your fingers.

Because of the extra energy you gave it, the ball had enough energy to reach a great height on its first bounce. But it always loses a certain amount of energy each time it bounces because of friction and deformation and so on.

why does a ball stop bouncing

When it hit the ground the 2nd time, it wasn't going quite as fast as when you threw it it had lost energyso it bounced up a little lower the 2nd time. And still lower the 3rd time, etc. Eventually it lost all of its energy and stopped bouncing.

There is gravity and also air resistance, maybe some friction on the ground, and the ground absorbs kinetic energy from the ball. Answer Save. RickB Lv 7. Favorite Answer. Good question! Tommy Slick Lv 5. Pancho loko. The force of gravity is downwards. So when the ball goes up gravity pulls down making it not to rise as high as you threw it.

It's not like it's not gonna stop bouncing isn't it? Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.Free Newsletter. Sign up below to receive insightful physics related bonus material. It's sent about once a month. Easily unsubscribe at any time. Join me on Patreon and help support this website.

Bouncing Ball Physics Bouncing ball physics is an interesting subject of analysis, demonstrating several interesting dynamics principles related to acceleration, momentum, and energy.

These principles will be discussed. Almost everybody, at some point in their lives, has bounced a rubber ball against the wall or floor and observed its motion.

Normally we don't think about the physics of bouncing balls too much as it's fairly obvious what is happening — the ball basically rebounds off a surface at a speed proportional to how fast it is thrown. But what isn't known to most is what is specifically happening to the ball before, during, and after its brief impact with the surface. To begin this explanation let's first consider what happens to a typical rubber ball that is dropped vertically onto a flat horizontal surface, and which falls under the influence of gravity.

In this explanation, the bouncing ball physics will be broken down into seven distinct stages, in which the ball motion before, during, and after impact is analyzed.

why does a ball stop bouncing

To simplify the discussion let's assume that the bounce surface is hard rigidand that air resistance is negligible. Let's define the geometric center of the ball as point Cthe velocity of point C as Vand the acceleration of point C as a. Let's further assume that the ball has uniform density, which means that point C of the ball coincides with its center of mass. Stage 1 In this stage, the ball falls vertically downward under the influence of gravity g.

The velocity V points downward. The acceleration a also points downward. The magnitude of a is equal to gin the absence of air resistance.

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Stage 2 In this stage, the ball begins to make contact with the surface. It continues to fall vertically downward under the influence of gravity. The velocity V and acceleration a equal to g both continue to point downward. Stage 3 In this stage, the ball has slowed down. The velocity V is still pointing downward. However, the ball has deformed sufficiently such that the acceleration a is now pointing upward. This means that the ball has deformed enough such that it's pushing against the surface with a force greater than its own weight.Topics discussed extend far beyond philosophy and philosophers.

What makes us a philosophy forum is more about our approach to the discussions and debates than what subject is being debated. Common topics include but are absolutely not limited to neuroscience, psychology, sociology, cosmology, religion, political theory, ethics, and so much more. Privacy Terms. Skip to content.

Quick links. Use this forum to discuss the philosophy of science. Philosophy of science deals with the assumptions, foundations, and implications of science. Does the ball ever stop bouncing? Take a rubber ball and bounce it against the ground. You'll see it go up and down faster and faster until it seems to stop. The mathematics, with certain assumptions, will say that the ball does indeed stop bouncing and I agree with this. I'm wondering if someone disagrees and why? What say you to this?

Re: Does the ball ever stop bouncing? Its energy is shifted into noise, friction heat and the kinetic energy is absorbed by the surface it hits, so you see a gradual decrease in the energy retained by the ball until it eventually stops. Though this could be countered by some extravagant methods, maybe with some oscillating magnets?

A little fun fact, a metal ball bounces higher and for a longer period of time than a rubber ball. But I don't want to give kids steel balls to play with The good life is one inspired by love, and guided by knowledge.

If they were, they wouldn't be models. They'd be reality. As Geordie says, the ball inevitably loses energy on each bounce. And an exponential decay never reaches zero. If, at every bounce, you can only ever lose a fraction of your total energy which is less than 1 and greater than 0, you can never lose all your energy.

In practice, inevitably, the system is more complex than that, and exponential decay is just an initial approximation. Once the bounce height gets lower than a certain level, all sorts of other factors will become more and more significant, until they become dominant.

Cue my favourite physicsy joke about the perils of using the highly idealized and reductionist techniques of physics to model complex physical systems like living things : A physicist is asked to predict the winner of a horse race.

Some time later, he is heard muttering: "OK, assume it's a spherical horse in a vacuum I like that joke. Everything in physics must be reduced with minimal possible variants and nearest approximations.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service. Physics Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for active researchers, academics and students of physics.

It only takes a minute to sign up. In short: Do bouncing balls keep bouncing forever? If not, does it have to do more with energy than velocity? If energy is conserved, why do bouncing balls, pendulums, and other cyclic systems eventually stop moving?

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The result is that most objects moving in cycles eventually move less and less and then finally stop. But that wouldn't make sense mathematically: although the limit converges to zero, it doesn't fully ever approach it. Do the mathematical laws break down at the micro physical level much like they do in general relativity? Every simple equation we use to model a system is based on assumptions, and these assumptions often cease to be accurate after a certain amount of time.

Given the intuition you may have developed from the simple versions of pendulums, bouncing balls, etc. Really, we have to consider what actually happens in these systems and how long our assumptions are valid.

why does a ball stop bouncing

The pendulum is easier. A perfect pendulum will swing forever. What is it that makes a pendulum non-perfect? Friction can come from the air around it and the pivot it swings on. Also, the swinging of the pendulum pulls its pivot side-to-side, transferring a little bit of energy into the system it's hanging from. Each of these effects can be characterized, but doing that requires some assumptions. Let's just worry about the friction.

Kinetic friction is the frictional force between two moving surfaces. If the surfaces aren't moving any longer, the surfaces 'settle in' a bit more and don't give way so easily. If you move slowly enough, however, you can get a little bit of both. This is what makes cellos to sound, hinges to squeak, and tires to screech. Static friction will kill your pendulum.

As for the bouncing ball, what is it that makes it bounce? When the ball hits the ground, it deforms and snaps back into place, launching itself into the air. But the ball doesn't return all of the energy; some of it ripples around the ball while it's in the air.


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